What will today’s CES inventions look like 30 years from now?

Will the future laugh at our selfie sticks? Probably.

The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is an annual convention where techies go to show off their latest electronic brainchild.The convention began in 1967 in New York City, and became a twice annual event with a Winter Consumer Electronics Show (WCES) held in Las Vegas, and a Summer Consumer Electronics Show (SCES) held in Chicago. Now a once-a-year event in Las Vegas, everything from robots to digital Holy Bibles to cellphones that weigh less than a cheeseburger have been showcased at the CES; some inventions made it far, and some didn’t make it past the front doors.

Today marks the first day of CES 2016, which runs until January 9. To celebrate, checkout this photo series of items that were presented at CES over the past three decades.
Left: A B.O.B. (Brains on Board) is being showcased in at the 1983 Consumer Electronics Convention in Chicago.
Right: Atari’s game, Mind Link, is being presented at the show in 1984 in Chicago.
Yes, this device says “The Holy Bible.” Franklin Computers brought this device to the 1989 CES in Chicago—we didn’t see much of this product after that, but you can apparently still buy it on Amazon.
This man is holding a child detecting device called “Beeper Kid.” Created by A+H International, this device would alert a parent via beeper when their child roams over 35 feet away—kind of a baby monitor meets child leash hybrid. This photo was taken at the CES in Chicago, 1992.
Virtual Vision Sport presented these virtual reality goggles in Chicago in 1993. Would you be caught wearing these? Let’s be real—virtual reality has always been pretty cool.
This guy’s holding a talking cheeseburger—just kidding. He’s actually trying to show how lightweight this Motorola cellphone is; it weighs 3.9 ounces (less than a cheeseburger). This photo was taken at the Chicago convention in 1994.
Here’s a demonstration of REALWare’s Virtual Hoops in 1996 in Las Vegas. Virtual reality has always been enticing for gamers; REALWare was on the right track.
This is the president and CEO of Philips Consumer Electronics Company, Robert Minkhorst, holding a DVD at the Las Vegas CES in 1996. This was also the company that invented Compact Cassettes, Compact Discs, and the Blu-ray Disc.
These two ITT Night Vision employees are showing off Night Quest night vision gadgets at the CES in 1996.
This pocket-sized scanner entitled Quicktionary, by Seiko, was capable of translating up to 400,000 written words via scanning technology. It was presented in a large-scale display at the CES in Las Vegas of 1998.
After surviving the Y2K, Plantronics’ product manager, Judy Baker, opens the new millennium with a CT10 cordless headset telephone on January 6, 2000 in Las Vegas.
Pretty revolutionary for its time, Samsung presented the SPH-S100 watch phone in 2001 in Las Vegas. Though we’ve seen more of these types of gadgets since then (such as the Apple Watch), we’re still having a hard time making watch phones a thing.
Here’s another watch, this time being worn by Bill Gates at the CES in 2003. This watch was created by Fossil and called a Smart Personal Object Technology (SPOT) wristwatch.
This is a photo of the Phillips Key019 Wearable Digital Camera at CES in Las Vegas in 2004.
Finally, this is a display full of audio players and phones from various companies at the CES in Las Vegas, back in 2005.
(Photos courtesy of Gizmodo)