Why Adele’s Rolling Stone cover is the definition of ‘perfect’

A role model of many sorts

You might assume, while looking at Adele’s Rolling Stone cover, that her choice to forgo heavy makeup and a full body shot is a “bold” move. But her “boldness” is mistaken for our cultural expectation; assuming a successful woman should be exposed head to toe wearing a full pallet of makeup.

That’s what many of us have come to be used to. Seeing a female celebrity shimmering like a god, pristine remarkable alien bodies that are in no way a reflection of the norm. The only way we can accept someone’s “celebrity”, especially for females, is determined by how done up they are. When they take photos for covers normally, they step up to the plate we arrange for them. Come into our world of expectations, put yourself on a pedestal and await our judgement.

Adele exists contrary to that idea. How could we even impose those ideals on Adele, since she isn’t living in our world. She’s an outsider and we’re begging to enter her realm. Looking like she’s in the comfort of her own home: wet hair, little makeup, in a bathrobe and a side glare as though we barely have her attention. This is what one of music’s most influential artists looks like, and she does it without even a peep of sex. This has nothing to do with beauty, simply an expression of power, like the dominating force Adele is.