10 movies by 2SLGBTQ+ filmmakers to watch this Pride

From 'Shiva Baby' to 'But I'm A Cheerleader'

Happy Pride! Although we’re in for another virtual Pride this year due to COVID-19, there are tons of ways to celebrate this month from the comfort of your home.

If you’re looking to grab some popcorn and sit down for a movie, you should celebrate with some amazing films from 2SLGBTQ+ filmmakers.

Check out 10 movies by 2SLGBTQ+ filmmakers to watch this Pride below.
 

Shiva Baby – Emma Seligman

Emma Seligman’s perfectly cringy comedy, Shiva Baby, stars Rachel Sennot as Danielle, a young bisexual Jewish woman who attends a shiva with her family. Among other attendees at the shiva include her ex-girlfriend Maya (Molly Gordon), her sugar daddy Max (Danny Deferrari), and his wife Kim (Dianna Agron), so buckle in and get ready for a hilariously uncomfortable flick.
 

Portrait of a Lady on Fire – Céline Sciamma

What’s a list of queer films without a period piece about lesbian yearning? Céline Sciamma’s 2019 historical romantic drama is set in France in the late 18th century, and it tells the tale of an affair between an aristocrat (Adèle Haenel) and a painter (Noémie Merlant) that has been commissioned to paint her portrait. This film is (of course) packed with 120 minutes of longing stares and brushing arms between unrequited lovers.
 

I Killed My Mother (J’ai tué ma mère) – Xavier Dolan

Canadian director Xavier Dolan’s directorial debut, I Killed My Mother, follows a complicated relationship between a young man named Hubert Minel (played by Dolan himself) and his mom (Anne Dorval). Hubert is a 16-year-old Québécois living in suburban Montreal with his single mother, Chantale, who finds out that her son’s friend Antonin is actually his boyfriend.
 

Appropriate Behavior – Desiree Akhavan

Desiree Akhavan not only wrote and directed this comedy, which premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, but she also stars as Shirin, a bisexual Persian American woman living in New York. Appropriate Behavior follows Shirin as she attempts to rebuild her life after her girlfriend Maxine breaks up with her, leaving her without a home or a job.
 

Weekend – Andrew Haigh

Andrew Haigh’s 2011 British romantic drama stars Tom Cullen and Chris New over just one weekend. Weekend follows the pair, who meet and start a sexual relationship just before one of them is supposed to leave the country for an art program.
 

I Am Love – Luca Guadagnino

Yes, he may be well-known for Call Me By Your Name, but Luca Guadagnino’s 2009 Italian romantic drama, I Am Love, is definitely worth a watch. This film serves as the first installment of Guadagnin’s self-described trilogy on desire, preceding 2015’s A Bigger Splash and 2017’s Call Me By Your Name. Starring Tilda Swinton, this film was created over a whopping 11 years.
 

The Living End – Gregg Araki

Often described as a “gay Thelma and Louise, Gregg Araki’s 1992 comedy-drama follows two gay, HIV positive men, Luke and Jon, who meet after Luke kills a homophobic police officer. Together, the pair embark on a road trip to get away, following the motto “Fuck everything.”
 

But I’m a Cheerleader – Jamie Babbit

But I’m a Cheerleader is an absolute classic, and if you haven’t seen it yet, it’s definitely a must-watch this Pride, and if you have seen it…well…watch it again. Jamie Babbit’s film follows high school cheerleader Megan Bloomfield (Natasha Lyonne) whose parents send her to an inpatient conversion therapy camp. The film also stars some big-name actors like Clea DuVall, RuPaul, Michelle Williams, and more.
 

Chutney Popcorn – Nisha Ganatra

Chutney Popcorn sees director Nisha Ganatra starring as a young lesbian Indian American woman, Reena, as it looks at the conflict between her sexuality and culture. Throughout the movie, Reena’s mother Meenu tries to come to terms with the Western lives her daughters are living.
 

Mosquita y Mari – Aurora Guerrero

Aurora Guerrero’s 2012 coming-of-age film Mosquita y Mari follows Yolanda Olveros (Fenessa Pineda), who meets and befriends her neighbour Mari Rodriguez (Venecia Troncoso) early in the film. Their complex friendship builds to an unexpected romantic moment between the two, and they are then forced to confront their inability to put their emotions into words.